Guest Post: Anxiety & Me – From a Teenagers Perspective

Hello, everyone! I don’t have guest posts very often on here but today I have an amazing post from the ever so lovely Daizy. You all know I suffer with anxiety and have wrote a fair few posts about it. There will never, ever be enough awareness for mental health disorders because even now, in 2016, we are still fighting the horrid stigma that comes with these conditions. Daizy has wrote a fantastic post about anxiety – but from a teenagers perspective, which is something I don’t have.

AaM

Hello lovelies, I’m Daizy from www.ZyaandDaizy.wordpress.com were two teen beauty and lifestyle bloggers from Essex, trying to make a difference in the world. Today, the lovey Jenny has kindly let me write a post that is very dear to my heart and share it with all you amazing people.

Living With Anxiety’ posts are becoming more and more now people are feeling much more brave on sharing their experiences with the world. As an avid blog reader (and a major nosey-parker) I’ve read a lot of blogs on Anxiety and how others have dealt with it. The thing is I’ve never actually read a post from a teenager’s perspective. I want to change that. I want for some confused teen/ kiddo to stumble upon this and know that they aren’t going crazy, that anxiety is a completely normal thing. This is the type of post I desperately needed a few years ago so I hope it may help someone else too, it can also help anyone else to know what It’s like now for young adults to suffer with a mental health problem in this day and age.

School
For me, big crowds, loud people cause my chest to go tight and my palms to go sweaty (gross I know, but that’s my reality). That’s basically high school summed up. Every day is a constant struggle of trying to keep the panic at bay. The problem is with the curriculum changing everything is getting much harder. This means double the tests, studying and work. This has caused me to be behind on lots of subjects as the stress of juggling all my work has affected me badly. Many teachers don’t understand that someone with Anxiety may need a little extra support as it can really become a massive struggle when you’re getting pages full of work from about 6 different teachers a day, 5 days a week with only up to 2 days to complete them. When embarrassingly ambling up to the teacher and murmuring my sorry excuses for not being able to do the work, I’m met with little sympathy. I get I’m supposed to do the work but please, a little less pressure would be great.

Going Out
Growing up means no more bouncy castle parties with jelly and ice cream after
*sighs*. That means, clubbing. (Cue the anxiety *sarcastically cheers*) Clubbing scares me to death. I hate going out in big groups already so politely decline the invites for house parties but, there’s only a certain amount of times you can decline before looking terribly rude. Now clubbing is the new thing for us all and if you don’t go to them, you’ll miss out on the beef for weeks. (Beef is like the new word for drama) As I’m writing this, the next Saturday I’m going to a night club with everyone in my year, emphasis on everyone. I’m terrified of having a dreadful panic attack surrounded by everyone. Literally my WORSE NIGHTMARE. The thing is I’ve been hiding in my hobbit hole for far too long and it’s about time I stepped out of my comfort zone. I was so close to chickening out, let me tell you that. When texting my lovely friend about how I have anxiety, the party is scaring me way to much so I cannot go, she sent me a massive long paragraph in response telling me it’ll be okay, she’ll support me and I’ll regret it if I don’t go. I’m determined to make my teenage years count and enjoy it. So I will be going clubbing (Even though it’s scaring the crap out of me) and try hard af to enjoy every second of it. Gotta live in the moment, right?

Support From Adults
Even though there is loads of people fighting Mental Health stigma and raising much more awareness, Adults still need to be made much more aware. As I was growing up, I never knew what Anxiety even was and I thought feeling that terrible pit in your stomach feeling which you get from accidently squishing your mum’s favourite Estee Lauder lipstick(or pit-in-your-stomach feelings in general); was normal. If you’re reading this you probably know what causes anxiety (If not: www.mind.org.uk) and having it from time to time is normal! But when it starts to interfere with your life, that’s when it becomes a problem.

My parents never picked up something was wrong, they thought I was just an overly worried kid. Like me, they were really un-educated on what Anxiety disorders were and had no idea it could actually be a problem. Loads of adults are the same. The other day in a lesson I heard a teacher joke about having depression, joking ‘Marking all your work makes me SO depressed!’ Using mental health problems as a joke is scarily becoming much more common. This needs to end. But if Teachers are using it so blatantly in front of us kids, what stops us from using it also? How are we supposed to ask for help if we are worried about what’s inside our heads if it’s being perceived as a joke?

In my first year of high school I tried to get help. I talked to my head of year about how I felt but instead of helping, I felt worse. She tried to blame it on my peers, pressuring me with statements like ‘I think it’s the people around you.’ When I definitely stated that wasn’t the case. Afterwards I felt shaken up, way more anxious and received no help whatsoever. She hadn’t even told my parents. WHAT?! I know. To me it’s shocking how I was treated and no child should have to go through the same experience I had endured. I don’t blame her on anything as I think she (and many other teachers) weren’t given enough information on the right approach on how to support someone like me, in their time of need.


Thank you so much for reading this long post, congrats if you made it this far! Also, a major thanks to Jenny for letting me write this post xxx
“Daizy”
From www.ZyaandDaizy.wordpress.com

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11 thoughts on “Guest Post: Anxiety & Me – From a Teenagers Perspective

  1. This is so important. I didn’t realise I had anxiety back in high school, as it translated mostly in physical ailments. I had such a hard time having to go to school every single day for 8 hours and I had so many stomach aches and headaches to show for it.

    You are one brave young lady, and thank you for this post. You are not alone. ♥

  2. Thankyou for sharing this post. It’s important to get more people talking about mental health and you are very brave for sharing about your experiences. Well done for deciding to step out of your comfort zone to go to the nightclub; I know how you’re feeling; I went out to nightclubs with my friends at university because I didn’t want to feel left out and sometimes, it was very hard and other times, I had a lot of fun. I hope you have a great time!

    http://www.raiin-monkey.blogspot.com

    • Thank YOU for commenting such a lovely message! You’re right, it’s so important for more people to talk about MH and it wasn’t bad but it wasn’t great either. It was actually really boring! Haha but I’m glad I did go and my fears weren’t a reality. But it was really nice spending time with friends and I still feel so proud of myself for going!

      Daizy from| http://www.ZyaandDaizy.wordpress.com XX

  3. Thank you so much for letting me write this post (Sorry this comment is very late, I have read this I assure you!)
    The comments I’ve seen and the new ones I’ve just read are amazing and really put a smile on my face. One day we will end MH stigma and create a better place for us all to live in

    Thank you again,
    Daizy from| http://www.ZyaandDaizy.wordpress.com XX

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