Travelling solo with a disability

Having a disability may be seen by many as a hindrance, but as people with disabilities know themselves, it’s an absolute sign of strength when you overcome potential obstacles and fulfill your aspirations. Travelling may be one of those said aspirations, and having a disability is no reason to head abroad and see the world. Here’s how to do it.

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Let people know in advance

When booking flights, transfers and other necessities for your trip, be sure to make your disability known. It’s important that those who need to know are aware, so that they can make the required adjustments and accommodate you more effectively. Whether it be flight staff, those taking you to and from the airports or even the hotel or accommodation you plan to stay at, you need to tell them if you need special considerations.

Ensure your chosen destination is right for you

It’s important to do some research into your chosen destination(s), as some hot-spots aren’t as accessible as others. Many major cities around the world have developed so that those with disabilities can get around with ease—look to see whether there are ramps, lifts and disability-friendly attractions to accommodate you.

Insurancewith lists Amsterdam, Seattle and Helsinki as just some of the most accessible cities for disabled travelers, but there are plenty more around the world to discover. When it comes to the more remote locations, it may be more of a challenge—but it’s worth researching whether it’s possible to visit with ease.

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Seek out disability-friendly attractions

When travelling, it makes sense to fill your time with visiting the best attractions in your location. Whether it’s a museum, theme park or a site of historical or cultural importance, be sure to research whether it’s suitable for disabled visitors.

There is nothing more disappointing than wanting to explore a certain attraction or location, yet being unable to because they don’t yet accommodate those with a disability. Although this is becoming more rare, it’s crucial you plan in advance to avoid being let down on the day.

Choose suitable accommodation

Another important thing to plan far in advance is your chosen accommodation. Despite many advancements being made over the years, there’s a disappointing number of hotels and other accommodation choices around the world that aren’t yet inclusive of disabled travelers—and this is even more likely when visiting lesser-known locations.

Ask before you book whether there are rooms specially dedicated to those with a disability. If not, ask to see if there are elevators, ramps and other ways to get around that won’t come to be a hindrance during your stay.

Overcome your fears

Don’t hesitate to get out there and explore the world to the fullest. You’re capable of more than you probably realise, and that couldn’t be more true when it comes to travelling. Be sure to push yourself within your limits and embrace the wonders of the world you discover.

For many, travelling is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity—don’t hold back.

* This is a collaborative post
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9 thoughts on “Travelling solo with a disability

  1. Those are some great tips! Everyone should be able to travel and having a disability should not stop people from doing that, I especially love that you talked about overcoming your fears as that is so important! 🙌🏼

  2. I always love seeing people travel solo – more power to them when they’re conquering it! It is so important to make sure people are aware of a disability ahead of time. People love to help and it helps them to know what to prepare for (e.g. bringing the right equipment to help you). With the whole movement for accessibility, there are more and more disability-friendly attractions around. Thanks for sharing!

    Nancy ♥ exquisitely.me

  3. nice post and good tips for those who are nervous on traveling with a disability. I have a pacemaker and i never let it slow me down on my solo travels! do you have a disability too? just curious 😀

  4. I love your tips, ironically enough I just started a blog about disabilities and the hidden problems mos people don’t notice. Even here in the US hotels and other business are not all accessible. As I recently found out.

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